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Oklahoma State University

Events

 

OSU IEEE January General Meeting

Date: 
Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Engineering South 201B
Who: You and other interested parties 
What: OSU IEEE January General Meeting. 
When: Wednesday, 25 January, 5:30 - 6:30 pm 
Where: Engineering South 201B 
Why: Not? Dinner will be served & Christine Huckleberry from CNI Aviation will present a talk entitled "Real World Troubleshooting: Navigating Multifaceted Problems". Christine works for the FAA in OKC under a contract the FAA has with CNI. See http://www.chickasaw.com/about/companies/cni-aviation-llc for information about this company. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federal_Aviation_Administration and https://www.faa.gov/ for information about the Federal Aviation Administration.
 

OSU IEEE November General Meeting.

Date: 
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Engineering South 412

Who: You and other interested parties
What: OSU IEEE November General Meeting.
When: Wednesday, 16 November, 5:30 - 6:30 pm
Where: Engineering South 412
Why: Not? Dinner will be served & reps from Textron Aviation will present. Textron Aviation is the parent company of Cessna, Beechcraft, and Hawker, makers of small prop and jet aircraft, as well as Bell Helicopter. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell_Helicopter, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Textron_Aviation and http://txtav.com/ for information about this company.

Present and Future Challenges of Data Storage Channels

Date: 
Wednesday, November 16, 2016 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
ATRC 102

Food provided at 12 P.M. - 12:30 P.M.
Food reservation can be made at the ES202 front desk one week prior to each seminar.


Dr. J.R. CruzDr. J.R. Cruz - Director and Tilley Chair Professor, School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma

J. R. Cruz (S’75-M’79-SM’85-F’01) received his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from the University of Porto, Portugal, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Houston, TX, USA, while holding a Fulbright Fellowship. He was with Computer Sciences Corporation at the NASA Johnson Space Center, and Motorola Research, prior to joining The University of Oklahoma, where he is currently a Professor, Director of the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and the holder of the Tilley Chair in Electrical Engineering. His research interests are in communications signal processing, particularly equalization, detection and coding techniques, with applications to digital data storage and transmission. He is a member of the Board of Governors and a Past President of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society, and a recipient of its Outstanding Service and Stuart Meyer Memorial Awards. He is a former Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology and currently serves as an Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Magnetics. He is a Fellow of the Radio Club of America, the recipient of the Armstrong Medal in 2014 and the IEEE Third-Millennium Medal in 2000. He was a Distinguished Lecturer for the IEEE Communications Society and the co-recipient of the Best Paper Prize in Signal Processing and Coding for Data Storage at the 2007 IEEE International Conference on Communications.

Seminar Abstract

Data storage plays a large role in our lives and drives an industry with annual sales approaching $30B. To be useful, data storage devices must be able to reliably read back the same data that was originally written. However, the underlying communication channels in these systems are inherently unreliable, often very unreliable, and behave in complex ways unlike simpler communications channels often found in transmission systems. Understanding the behavior of these complex channels is necessary in order to design reliable data storage systems that can overcome these challenges. In this lecture, we first discuss the magnetic recording channel for high-density hard-disk drives and our development of a state-the-art channel model. We also discuss NAND-flash solid-state drive channels as well as future non-volatile memories such as spin-torque transfer random access memory (STT-RAM), and explore how all these channels pose special problems for reliable storage system design.

Full color flyer (pdf)

OSU IEEE October General Meeting

Date: 
Wednesday, October 12, 2016 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
Engineering South 201b

Who: You and other interested parties
What: OSU IEEE October General Meeting.
When: Wednesday, 12 October, 5:30 - 6:30 pm
Where: Engineering South 201b
Why: Not? Dinner will be served & reps from Boeing will present. See www.boeing.com and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing for information about this company.

Engineers Help Unravel the Mysteries of the Brain

Date: 
Tuesday, October 11, 2016 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
ATRC 102

Food provided at 12 P.M. - 12:30 P.M.
Food reservation can be made at the ES202 front desk one week prior to each seminar.


Dr. Scott T. ActonDr. Scott T. Acton - Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering and of Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia

Professor Acton’s laboratory at UVA is called VIVA - Virginia Image and Video Analysis. They specialize in biomedical image analysis problems. The research emphasis of VIVA is video tracking and segmentation. Professor Acton has over 275 publications in the image analysis area including the books Biomedical Image Analysis: Tracking and Biomedical Image Analysis: Segmentation. Professor Acton has been at the University of Virginia since 2000. Before that time, he was on the faculty at Oklahoma State University (1994-2000). He’s worked in industry for AT&T, Motorola and the Mitre Corporation. He is editor-in-chief of the IEEE Transactions on Image Processing.

Seminar Abstract

This talk highlights the intersection of engineering and neuroscience. The scientific community is attempting to map the structure and connectivity of neurons in organisms such as Drosophila – the fruit fly. To accomplish such an atlas, automated image analysis is required and stands as a major roadblock to success. The talk addresses recent progress in the segmentation and tracing of individual neurons.  Graph theoretic and diffusion-based methods are discussed along with results. Also, the comparison and matching of neurons is described. This last portion of the research addresses the open question: can we quantify morphological change in neurons?

Full color flyer (pdf)

Technology, Computer Architecture and Memory

Date: 
Thursday, September 29, 2016 - 12:30pm to 1:30pm
Location: 
ATRC 102

Food provided at 12 P.M. - 12:30 P.M.
Food reservation can be made at the ES202 front desk one week prior to each seminar.


Dr. Mark D HillDr. Mark D Hill - Gene M. Amdahl and John P. Morgridge Professor of Computer Sciences, University of Wisconsin- Madison

Professor Hill is a senior computer architect at Wisconsin interested in parallel-computer system design, memory system design, and computer simulation. He developed the 3C cache miss taxonomy (compulsory, capacity, and conflict) and co-developed “sequential consistency for data-race free” that serves as a foundation of the C++ and Java memory models. He is a fellow of IEEE and the ACM, co-inventor on 35 patents, and taught more than 1000 students with 40 Ph.D. progeny so far. Hill has a PhD in computer science from the University of California, Berkeley and currently serves as Vice Chair of the Computer Community Consortium.

Seminar Abstract

First, this talk will discuss how challenges to Moore’s Law will open up new directions for computer systems, including architecture as infrastructure, energy first, impact of emerging technologies, and cross-layer opportunities. Second, the talk will delve into examples of cross-layer research driven by changes in memory due to the million-fold memory capacity growth, the introduction of general-purpose graphics processing unit computing, and non-volatile memory’s fusing of memory and storage. While computing gets the glory, remember that it is vast memory that makes most interesting computation possible!

Full color flyer (pdf)

Annual IEEE/ECE Fall Picnic

Date: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2016 - 5:30pm to 7:30pm
Location: 
NW Corner Pavilion, Boomer Lake

WHO: You and other interested parties
WHAT: Annual IEEE/ECE Fall Picnic
WHEN: Wednesday, 21 September, 5:30 -7:30 pm
WHERE: NW Corner Pavilion, Boomer Lake
WHY: Not? Enjoy grilled burgers, volleyball, disc golf, and fabulous conversation for only $2 a head

OSU IEEE September General Meeting

Date: 
Wednesday, September 14, 2016 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
ES201B

WHO: You and other interested parties
WHAT: OSU IEEE September General Meeting
WHEN: Wednesday, 14 September, 5:30 - 6:30 pm
WHERE: ES201B
WHY: Reps from Phillips66 will present. See http://www.phillips66.com/EN/Pages/index.aspx & https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phillips_66 for more information about this company. Plus you get a free meal.

OSU IEEE August General Meeting

Date: 
Wednesday, August 31, 2016 - 5:30pm to 6:30pm
Location: 
ES201B

WHO: You and other interested parties
WHAT: OSU IEEE August General Meeting
WHEN: Wednesday, 31 August, 5:30 - 6:30 pm
WHERE: ES201B
WHY: Reps from Credera Consulting will present. See https://www.credera.com/ for more information about this company.

Application of Game Theory to High Assurance Cloud Computing

Date: 
Tuesday, August 30, 2016 - 3:00pm to 4:30pm
Location: 
ATRC101

The growth of cloud computing has spurred many entities, both small and large, to use cloud services for cost savings. Public cloud computing has allowed for quick, dynamic scalability without many overhead or long-term commitments. However, concern over cyber security is the main reason many large organizations with sensitive information such as the Department of Defense have been reluctant to join a public cloud. This is due to three challenging problems. First, the current cloud infrastructures lack provable trustworthiness. Integrating Trusted Computing (TC) technologies with cloud infrastructure shows a promising method for verifying the cloud’s behaviors, which may in turn facilitate provable trustworthiness. Second, public clouds have the inherent and unknown danger stemming from a shared platform - namely, the hypervisor. An attacker that subverts a virtual machine (VM) and then goes on to compromise the hypervisor can readily compromise all virtual machines on that hypervisor. We propose a security-aware virtual machine placement scheme in the cloud. Third, a sophisticated attack in a cloud has to be understood as a sequence of events that calls for the detection/response model to encompass observations from varying dimensions. We discuss a method to automatically determine the best response, given the observations on the system states from a set of monitors.

Game theory provides a rich mathematical tool to analyze conflict within strategic interactions and thereby gain a deeper understanding of cloud security issues. Theoretical constructs or mathematical abstractions provide a rigorous scientific basis for cyber security because they allow for reasoning quantitatively about cyber-attacks. This talk will address the three cloud security challenging problems identified above and report on our latest findings from this body of work.


Dr. Charles Kamhoua

Charles A. Kamhoua received the BS in electronic from the University of Douala (ENSET), Cameroon, in 1999, and the MS in telecommunication and networking and the PhD in electrical engineering from Florida International University (FIU), in 2008 and 2011, respectively. In 2011, he joined the Cyber Assurance Branch of the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Rome, New York, as a National Academies Postdoctoral Fellow and became a Research Electronics Engineer in 2012. Prior to joining AFRL, he was an educator for more than 10 years. His current research interests include the application of game theory to cyber security, survivability, cloud computing, hardware Trojan, online social network, wireless communication and cyber threat information sharing. He has more than 60 technical publications in prestigious journals and International conferences along with a Best Paper Award at the 2013 IEEE FOSINTSI. He has mentored more than 40 young scholars at AFRL counting Summer Faculty Fellow, postdoc, and students. He has been invited to more than 30 keynote and distinguished speeches in the USA and abroad. He has been recognized for his scholarship and leadership with numerous prestigious awards including 30 Air Force Notable Achievement Awards, the 2016 FIU CharlesE. Perry Young Alumni Visionary Award, the 2015 AFOSR Windows on the World Visiting Research Fellowship at Oxford University, UK, an AFOSR Basic Research Award, the 2015 Black Engineer of the Year Award (BEYA), the 2015 NSBE Golden Torch Award—Pioneer of the Year, selection to the 2015 Heidelberg Laureate Forum, and the 2011 NSF PIRE Award at the Fluminense Federal University, Brazil. He is currently an advisor for the National Research Council, a member of ACM, the FIU alumni association, NSBE and a senior member of IEEE.

Full color flyer (pdf)